Gyre

 

The cover of State of the World 2010, itself, is symbolic of Transforming Cultures.

Gyre

The image, Gyre, comes from the artist Chris Jordan. Jordan created the image from the refuse of consumer cultures of the world–namely 2.4 million bits of plastic, which represents the amount of plastic in pounds entering the world’s oceans every hour. Here is a close-up of the peak of Mt. Fuji from Gyre:

Mount Fuji

Closer…

Mount Fuji Closer

Even Closer…

Mount Fuji Even Closer

Mount Fuji Even Closer

Like the tsunami portrayed, consumerism has engulfed human cultures and Earth’s ecosystems. But we do not have to wait placidly until our lives and homes are swept away by this wave. We can channel it, using leading institutions that drive cultures–business, government, education, the media, traditions, and social movements–and create new cultures centered on sustainability. By cultivating new symbols, norms, customs, traditions, and values, we’ll be able to embed sustainability directly into all that we do. And in today’s globalized world, a powerful symbol can transform cultures, whether we’re talking about two golden arches, a swoosh, or a looming wave. For those of you not familiar with it, this wave comes from an almost 200-year old woodblock print, The Great Wave off Kanagawa, from Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai, and is now recognized worldwide.

GreatWaveoffKanagawa

Globalization is nothing new–cultures have intermixed around the world across history. But in today’s overtaxed world, what is essential is that we channel these forces of globalization to develop cultures of sustainability.

  One Response to “Gyre”

  1. […] plastskräp. Det representerar den mängd plast som slängs i världens hav varje timme. Bilden är omslagsbild till årets rapport från Worldwatch […]

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