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The Sustainability Sweet Spot

 Posted by Alison Singer on March 20, 2012
Mar 202012
 

Only Peru finds itself in the sustainability sweet spot--and just barely. (Figure 1-2 from State of the World 2012)

What does a truly sustainable country look like?  How do you measure true sustainability in a country? One way has been to compare how well a country achieves human needs, and at what ecological cost. WWF Global arrives at this by comparing two measures: the United Nation’s Human Development Index and the Ecological Footprint measure. To be sustainable, a country must first get a Human Development Index score of over 0.08–a number the UN deems the lowest threshold for a high level of human development (i.e. meeting the needs of the present). The country must also have an ecological footprint of less than 1.8 hectares per person, the global average limit for not undermining the earth’s ability to regenerate (i.e. meeting the needs of the future).

According to that calculus, in 2007 only one country in the world could be listed as sustainable: Peru, with a Human Development Index of 0.086 and an ecological footprint of 1.5 hectares. Cuba had been in that sustainability sweet spot the year before, but had just missed the ecological footprint cut-off. Ecuador and Columbia, as well, hovered on the edge of sustainability.

Of course, sustainability is easier for a country blessed with abundant natural resources. Approximately 50 percent of Peru is covered by lush rainforest, providing ample timber and water resources. While much of Peru’s rainforests are conserved, there is a high level of both legal and illegal deforestation due to illegal squatting, road expansion, mining, and petroleum drilling. Though Peru struggles with wealth inequity and environmental degradation, it recognizes that moving towards sustainable prosperity requires government intervention. Peru’s Environment Minister hopes to virtually eliminate deforestation using international aid in addition to Peru’s own resources. Peru’s Prime Minister has vowed to not allow environmental pollution, and the government demands environmental impact assessment for mining operations. However, it appears that much of Peru’s sustainability is due to natural resources and a decent level of equity that ensures a basic level of development for most. Of course, there are also a variety of organizations working to protect Peru’s natural resources and thus create a truly sustainable country.

Cuba found itself in this sustainability sweet spot for a very different set of reasons. Cuba’s agricultural system depended to a large degree on exporting sugar to the Soviet Union—a very resource intensive and fragile farming strategy. Once the Soviet Union collapsed, Cuba was forced to fend for itself, and in doing so promoted organic farming and land conservation. In fact, Cuba is one of the few nations that has actually seen an increase in forest cover. Of course Cuba didn’t have much choice—thanks to the US trade embargo—but one could argue that at this point nobody has a choice, thanks to the rapid breakdown of Earth’s ecosystems services, including climate regulation.

When faced with crisis, Cuba responded with massive agricultural reforms focusing on local, sustainable and organic agriculture (as the below documentary describes). The government turned over half of the state-held farmland to the people in the form of cooperatives. Farmers were permitted to sell excess yield at farmers’ markets, leading to higher incomes and affordable pricing. Citizens were allowed to take over vacant lots as long as they were used for food production. The Asociacion Cubana de Agricultura Organica was created to promote organic farming techniques, such as crop rotation, composting, and green manure, and encourage knowledge-sharing. Around 75 percent of Cuba’s agriculture is now organic.

The problem is that most governments are either too deeply in denial or captured by interests to take such bold steps. Hence, the odds of other countries joining the sustainability sweet spot—where both high levels of development and low ecological impact—are extremely low. But with committed efforts it is possible, and there are signs of such efforts emerging, particularly in the agricultural sector. Examples abound from places as diverse as New York City, Egypt, and China of more sustainable way of growing, transporting, and consuming food. And while local and national governments support sustainable measures to varying degrees, many of these developments are being implemented through community organizations. Scaling these up will demand deeper government intervention, which we can only hope will grow more common, and not just after major ecological disturbances demand it.

A rural mountain farm (photo courtesy of Peter Griffin via public domain photos)

  9 Responses to “The Sustainability Sweet Spot”

  1. Re Cuba in a “sustainability sweet spot.” Are you kidding ? If not Worldwatch reliability should be questioned.
    Per http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agriculture_in_Cuba (and similar on other web sites):
    >>The inefficient agricultural industry in Cuba has led to the need to import large amounts of foods.[2] Cuba now imports about 80% of the food it rations to the public.[2] The rationing program accounts for about a third of the food energy the average Cuban consumes.[3]<<
    Cuba's ability to import food is dependent primarily on (1) cash sent from former Cubans living in the US to relatives in Cuba and (2) tourist expenditure within Cuba — tourists who for the most part flew from Europe or Canada. (I do hope that Worldwatch considers long distance tourism an unsustainable practice.)

    • Jon – you bring up a good point: Cuba is certainly not a self-sustaining country, nor is it as sustainable as it could be. However, it has made tremendous strides towards agricultural sustainability after the fall of the Soviet Union. After Raul Castro took office he admitted some of the shortcomings in the agricultural system, specifically mentioning the high imports of rations, and took steps to increase farming. While there are still bureaucratic obstacles to overcome, Cuba is working towards improving their agricultural system, and while it remains imperfect, and surely always will, there are important lessons to be learned from their shift on sugar dependency to organic farming. Here are a couple interesting articles that might clarify things: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129757511. http://havanajournal.com/business/entry/cuba-farming-and-agricultural-reforms-update/.

  2. I would like Worldwatch to respond to this please. I was inspired by this story then extremely disappointed to find that it is not true. Regarding Cuba that is. Is this bad and mis-leading journalism or is there information missing?

  3. [...] Worldwatch sums up the situation in Peru: Sustainability is easier for a country blessed with abundant natural resources. Approximately 50 percent of Peru is covered by lush rainforest, providing ample timber and water resources. While much of Peru’s rainforests are conserved, there is a high level of both legal and illegal deforestation due to illegal squatting, road expansion, mining, and petroleum drilling. Though Peru struggles with wealth inequity and environmental degradation, it recognizes that moving towards sustainable prosperity requires government intervention. Peru’s Environment Minister hopes to virtually eliminate deforestation using international aid in addition to Peru’s own resources. Peru’s Prime Minister has vowed to not allow environmental pollution, and the government demands environmental impact assessment for mining operations. However, it appears that much of Peru’s sustainability is due to natural resources and a decent level of equity that ensures a basic level of development for most. Of course, there are also a variety of organizations working to protect Peru’s natural resources and thus create a truly sustainable country. [...]

  4. [...] Sustainable Prosperity to accompany the report.The Institute highlights a concept called “sustainability sweet spot” with data compiled from Global Footprint Network and UNDP. It attempts to answer questions [...]

  5. [...] Institute highlights a concept called “sustainability sweet spot” with data compiled from Global Footprint Network and UNDP. It attempts to answer questions [...]

  6. I was wondering, if it is still possible to watch the video, whih you mention in your post. It seems to not be working anymore.

    • I updated the link so you should be able to watch the full documentary now. Thanks for pointing out that the video was no longer working.

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