Last week, Panama hosted the XXII Energy and Environment Partnership (EEP) Central American Regional Forum, an event designed to present examples of EEP-funded projects that show productive uses of energy in the Central America region.

Created in 2002 during the United Nations World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg, South Africa, the EEP aims to contribute to sustainable development and climate change mitigation in Central America through the promotion of renewable energy. The effort is supported by Finland’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in coordination with the Central American Integration System and the Central American Environment and Development Commission, and by the Austrian Development Cooperation.

Presenters at the XXII EEP Central American Regional Forum in Panama (Source: EEP).

Over the last decade, the EEP has supported more than 280 projects in Central America with a total of €13.9 million, 80 percent of which was used exclusively for project funding. At the recent Forum, Dr. Salvador Rivas, regional coordinator of the EEP, summarized the projects implemented to date and noted that the EEP’s strategy model is grounded on four pillars: pilot projects, energy and environmental policy, capacity building, and market development.

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Central America, renewable energy, renewable energy investment, renewable energy policy, small hydropower, solar power, wind power

Solar and wind continue to dominate investment in new renewable capacity. Global use of solar and wind energy grew significantly in 2012. Solar power consumption increased by 58 percent, to 93 terrawatt-hours (TWh), while wind power increased by 18.1 percent, to 521.3 TWh.

Global investment in solar energy in 2012 was $140.4 billion, an 11 percent decline from 2011, and wind investment was down 10.1 percent, to $80.3 billion. Due to lower costs for both technologies, however, total installed capacities still grew sharply.

Solar and wind energy investments were down slightly in 2012, though installed capacities still grew sharply (Source: BNEF).

Solar photovoltaic (PV) installed capacity grew by 41 percent in 2012, reaching 100 gigawatts (GW). Installed PV capacity has grown by 900 percent since 2007. The countries with the most installed PV capacity today are Germany (32.4 GW), Italy (16.4 GW), the United States (7.2 GW), and China (7.0 GW). Concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) capacity reached 2.55 GW, with 970 megawatts (MW) alone added in 2012.

Europe remains dominant in solar, accounting for 76 percent of global solar power use in 2012. Germany alone accounted for 30 percent of the world’s solar power consumption, and Italy added the third most capacity of any country in 2012 (3.4 GW). Spain added the most CSP capacity (950 MW) in 2012 as well. However, Italy reached the subsidy cap for its feed-in tariff (FIT) program in June 2013, while Spain recently made a retroactive change in its FIT policies, meaning that growth in solar energy will likely slow in these countries in the near future.

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China, feed-in tariff, Germany, Italy, japan, renewable energy, renewable energy investment, renewable energy policy, solar power, Spain, United States, wind power

This week members of Worldwatch’s Climate and Energy team traveled to Barbados to participate in the Mobilization Forum in support of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat’s Caribbean Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Initiative (C-SERMS). It was an opportunity for various projects to share their respective final results related to the larger C-SERMS platform. It was also a chance for international donors and project developers to take initial steps in exploring potential follow-up work. In the words of Ambassador Joan Underwood of Antigua and Barbuda, “This is kind of like speed dating. We’re not looking for a full on proposal, just trying to see if a pair might be interested in a second date.” While no “second date” officially materialized, those in attendance were very clear that the steps CARICOM member states are taking show real promise in creating a more secure and sustainable energy sector in the region and that strong interdependence will be necessary for that progress to continue.