Sowing the Seeds of a Food-Secure Future

Share
Pin It

By Dana Drugmand

Worldwide, 195 million children suffer from malnutrition, which adversely affects their development and overall well-being. Approximately 26 percent of these children live in sub-Saharan Africa. And according to the International Food Policy Research Institute, the number of malnourished children in the region will rise 18 percent between 2001 and 2020. Fortunately, innovations such as school feeding programs and kitchen vegetable gardens are working to combat malnutrition and hunger in African children.

Schoolchildren in Uganda are learning how to grow fruits and vegetables in kitchen gardens funded by Seeds for Africa. (Photo Credit: Kellogg)

One organization, Seeds for Africa, has been instrumental in helping children gain access to local, nutritious fruits and vegetables. A central part of this organization’s work is teaching children the value of growing their own food by helping them to establish kitchen gardens and fruit tree orchards. Seeds for Africa funds kitchen vegetable garden development at primary schools in Malawi, Kenya, Uganda, and Sierra Leone.

In Kenya, Seeds for Africa coordinator Thomas Ndivo Muema has helped primary schools in the Nairobi region establish vegetable gardens and orchards of 200 fruit trees and has also supplied water tanks. In Uganda, fruit trees and vegetable gardens have been established at 77 schools around Kampala, the capital city. And in Sierra Leone, Seeds for Africa coordinator Abdul Hassan King has helped oversee tree planting projects in 50 primary schools and advised kitchen vegetable gardens operating at 15 other schools.

In 2011, Kellogg UK donated £6434 (US$9,946) to Seeds for Africa to fund “breakfast clubs” in Kenya, Uganda, and Zambia—clubs in which schoolchildren are fed breakfast if they attend class. In many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, some 60 percent of children come to school without having eaten breakfast, if they attend school at all. By providing a nutritious breakfast, the initiative helps to improve attendance as well as academic performance and student well-being. Results from breakfast club trials indicate that students who participated scored better on school tests and were happier overall than students who did not participate. School attendance also increased to 95 percent.

Although children are the focus of Seeds for Africa’s work, the organization also provides assistance to community groups. It provides inputs—including native seeds, plants, and agricultural equipment—and technical advice to community members in an effort to help them establish and profit from family vegetable gardens.

Do you know of other initiatives working to improve food security and alleviate hunger and malnutrition among children in Africa? Let us know in the comments section below!

Dana Drugmand is a former research intern with the Worldwatch Institute’s Food and Agriculture Department.

 

Similar posts:
  1. Taking Every Step to Promote a More Food-Secure Future
  2. Conserving Our Genetic Resources for a More Food Secure Future
  3. Sowing the Seeds of Knowledge: An Interview with Linda Borghi and Olatunde Johnson
  4. Home Grown and Healthy Food
  5. Seeds, seeds, seeds: Egusi, the Miracle Melon
  6. Nourishing the Planet TV: School Feeding Programs Improve Livelihoods, Diets, and Local Economies
  7. Farmers of the Future – Building the Curriculum
  8. African Biodiversity Network: Sowing Seeds for Grassroots Resilience