In Case You Missed it: This Week in Review

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This week, we profile five organizations  that are sharing knowledge for success across the world. One of these organizations, the Africa Rice Center, works with 24 countries across the continent, connecting researchers, rice farmers, and rice processors. Click here  to read about the other four.

Photo credit: Bernard Pollack

In our Citywatch post, Wayne Roberts analyzes the successes and shortcomings of the recent Rio+20 Conference, and discusses the potential of an organization called C40 Cities to spur sustainable urban development. Meanwhile, our Saturday Series interviewee, Kari Hamerschlag of the Environmental Working Group, provides an insider’s look at the Farm Bill process and U.S. agricultural policy.

And we analyze a recent report  by the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy that points to trade liberalization as a contributor to high obesity rates. The study, published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health, investigated the links between the health of the Mexican population and the country’s trade with the United States.

Further highlights from this past week:

Our indigenous food product of the week is Cobia, a species of fish found throughout the world’s tropical and subtropical waters. Many of the world’s most popular fish species are being overfished to satisfy growing demand for seafood, and Cobia may offer a sustainable solution to overfishing.

We highlight a report from August 2011 entitled, “The Food Crises and Political Instability in North Africa and the Middle East,” which reveals a link between the background trend of rising global food prices and riots around the globe. Social unrest, the NECSI report explained, often reflects severe cases of poverty, unemployment, and injustice.  While food prices might not be the primary cause of protests, it provides a platform for populations to revolt.

And in this week’s NtP TV episode, we discuss how the Breadfruit Institute is working to provide farmers with a sustainable, low-input, and nutritious crop.

Now it’s your turn: What were your favorite posts from the week? What do you hope we’ll write about next week? Let us know in the comments!

To purchase State of the World 2011: Innovations that Nourish the Planet please click HERE. And to watch the one-minute book trailer, click HERE.

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