In Case You Missed it: This Week in Review

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This week, we examined the impacts that rising food prices have on small scale farmers in many developing countries, who often have to spend up to 70 percent of their income on food. Our Nourishing the Planet TV episode discussed World Neighbors, a non-profit that works in farming communities around the world to teach sustainable agricultural practices, including drip irrigation and terracing techniques. And in this week’s Citywatch post, food analyst Wayne Roberts discussed how 2012 could be the year of youth- and activist-led movements for a more just food system.

Photo credit: Bernard Pollack

Our State of the World 2011 report received some exciting press coverage this week. Check out these reviews of the report in the U.K.’s The New Agriculturist and Australia’s ECOS Magazine. Meanwhile our 12 recommendations to go green were featured in Fox News.

Highlights from this past week:

Starting this weekend, over 1,000 young athletes from 70 nations will compete in the first ever Winter Youth Olympic Games in Innsbruck, Austria. As we prepare to cheer the young athletes of the Winter Youth Olympics, Nourishing the Planet would also like to applaud the young leaders of sustainability efforts across the globe. In this post, we honor 10 medal-worthy organizations and their youth-focused sustainability efforts.

The UN Food and Agriculture Organization reports that an estimated one-third of the food produced worldwide for human consumption is wasted annually. In the United States, an estimated 40 percent of edible food is thrown away by retailers and households. In the United Kingdom, 8.3 million tons of food is wasted by households each year. In this post Nourishing the Planet presents five ways that consumers can help prevent food waste.

And our indigenous crop of the week is the horned melon, a plant that grows from southern Africa to Nigeria and Ethiopia. This fruit, which turns fluorescent green when ripe, can be consumed in a number of ways—people in Malawi tend to eat it raw, as a relish, or even pickled, while in the Kalahari, it is baked or cut and sun-dried.

Now it’s your turn: What were your favorite posts from the week? What do you hope we’ll write about next week? Let us know in the comments!

To purchase State of the World 2011: Innovations that Nourish the Planet please click HERE. And to watch the one minute book trailer, click HERE.

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