In Case You Missed it: This Week in Review

Share
Pin It

This week, Nourishing the Planet’s op-ed about efforts to reduce food waste was published in Canada’s Calgary Herald. An article on project Director Danielle Nierenberg’s trip to sub-Saharan Africa was also published in Tufts University’s Now publication.

Photo credit: Bernard Pollack

Our Nourishing the Planet TV episode this week discusses school feeding programs that are helping children and their families in many parts of Africa, where 60 percent of children come to school in the morning without breakfast. In this week’s Citywatch post, food policy analyst Wayne Roberts discusses how cities can be major players in addressing food security if urban policies are improved to allow for local and sustainable food production. And in this guest post, BOLD Food Fellow Alex Zizinga discusses the Community Livelihood Project in Uganda which is helping connect farmers with researchers in an effort to improve food production in the region.

Highlights from this past week:

In this interview, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s analyst Christa Essig discusses the state of public health in the United States. According to her, “The food system and environment solutions need to be multi-faceted, community-led, and community-specific—we need to look inside our schools, hospitals, worksites and communities and aim to be culturally and locally appropriate.”

We highlighted the The Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR)’s new Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Knowledge Network which aims to serve as an important resource for farmers in regions vulnerable to climate-change-induced weather irregularities. Using an interactive map platform that draws on field and anecdotal evidence from research stations around the world, the network is supplying farmers with the information they need to make more informed planting decisions.

Our What Works post this week highlighted composting efforts in sub-Saharan Africa that are helping farmers to convert waste in to fertilizer. Communities such as the Ibo tribe of Nigeria, for example, have been using branches from trees for mulching, applying goat dung to individual plants, and composting human waste as early as the 1970’s. And in Zimbabwe, farmers traditionally graze cattle during the day and contain them in pens at night so that they can collect the manure and spread it over farmland.

Now it’s your turn: What were your favorite posts from the week? What do you hope we’ll write about next week? Let us know in the comments!

To purchase your own copy of State of the World 2011: Innovations that Nourish the Planet, please click HERE. And to watch the one minute book trailer, click HERE.

Similar posts:
  1. In Case You Missed It: The Week in Review
  2. In Case You Missed It: The Week in Review
  3. In Case You Missed It: The Week in Review
  4. In Case You Missed It: The Week in Review
  5. In Case You Missed It: The Week in Review
  6. In Case You Missed it: This Week in Review
  7. In Case You Missed it: This Week in Review
  8. In Case You Missed it: This Week in Review