In Case You Missed it: This Week in Review

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This week, Nourishing the Planet launched the Portuguese edition of our State of the World 2011 report in Sao Paulo, Brazil. You can access a copy of it here. We also highlighted a recent event hosted by The Atlantic, which explored the question “how do we sustainably continue to feed a growing global population?”

Photo credit: Bernard Pollack

Check out our post on U.S. Food Day, which is being celebrated around the country tomorrow, October 24th. Sponsored by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a nonprofit watchdog group that fights for food labeling, better nutrition, and safer food, Food Day is a great opportunity to promote safe, healthy, and affordable food, humane farming, and fair trading conditions.

We also highlighted this post by William Dar, the Director General of the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) in India, where he called for a global partnership to tackle the desertification that degrades more than 12 million hectares of arable land every year.

Highlights from this past week:

Check out our post on the Cadbury Corporation’s bicycle campaign, which is working to raise funds to build 5,000 bikes a year for children in rural Ghana. Cadbury urges their consumers to enter the UPC barcode numbers from Cadbury products into their website. Each barcode represents one physical component of a bike called the Nframa, which means “wind” in Ghanaian. One bike is made up of 100 parts, meaning it takes 100 UPC entries to “build” a bike.

In this interview with Diana Lee-Smith, founder of the Mazingira Institute, an independent research and development organization based in Nairobi, Kenya, she discussed the challenges and opportunities that urban agriculture can bring to residents in developing countries.

Our indigenous livestock this week is the Red Maasai East African sheep, also called Tanganyika Short-tailed, a hardy breed of sheep indigenous to northern Tanzania, south central Kenya, and Uganda. While other sheep, known as Dorpers, were imported to East Africa from South Africa, Red Maasai have become a proven resource for pastoralists because of their resistance to worms and adaptation to semi-arid climates.

Now it’s your turn: What were your favorite posts from the week? What do you hope we’ll write about next week? Let us know in the comments!

To purchase your own copy of State of the World 2011: Innovations that Nourish the Planet, please click HERE. And to watch the one minute book trailer, click HERE.

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