The Climate Crisis on Our Plates

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ChinaDialogue recently published this excerpt from State of the World 2011: Innovations that Nourish the Planet, in which Anna Lappé, co-founder of the Small Planet Fund, discusses the climate crisis on our plates.

Climate Crisis on our plates-Anna-Lappe-Small-Planet-Fund-Climate-Change-China-Dialogue

Individuals can help provide market demand for climate-friendly foods by following the principles of a climate-friendly diet. (Photo credit: Bernard Pollack)

Although agriculture is directly affected by climate change, the global food system is responsible for as much as one third of global greenhouse gas emissions. But by using techniques that work with, rather than, against the natural ecosystem, farmers from all over the world are showing the positive role food systems can and should play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, writes Lappé.

And individuals can help provide market demand for climate-friendly foods by following the principles of a climate-friendly diet and supporting the efforts of farmers as they prepare for an uncertain future. Lappé says, “We can choose to eat foods from sustainable farms, reduce consumption of highly processed foods, and cut back — or cut out — meat and dairy that comes from factory farms. We can also reach for local and regionally grown foods.”

To purchase State of the World 2011: Innovations that Nourish the Planet please click HERE. And to watch the one minute book trailer, click HERE.

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