installing_solar_panels_7336033672

The Future of Sustainable Energy in the Caribbean

This Saturday marks the first anniversary of the launch of the Caribbean Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy (C-SERMS) Baseline Report and Assessment.

In the coming weeks, Worldwatch will publish a series of blogs and interviews commemorating its Sustainable Energy Roadmaps for the Caribbean region, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Jamaica. We will assess where the Caribbean stands today with regard to energy, what major challenges it still faces, and what lies ahead.

Part 1: Happy Birthday, Caribbean Sustainable Energy Roadmap!

Why are we celebrating the Caribbean Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy (C-SERMS) Baseline Report and Assessment this year?

We’re proud to say that since its launch in October 2015, Worldwatch’s C-SERMS report has laid the groundwork for 15 Caribbean Community (CARICOM) member countries to agree on an ambitious regional target of 48 percent renewable energy generation by 2027.

The report also shows that an energy efficiency target of a 33 percent reduction in the region’s energy intensity is achievable by 2027. Reaching these sustainable energy goals would result in a 46 percent decrease in regional carbon dioxide emissions.

Our study started with an assessment of the energy situation in the Caribbean.

How did we set these targets? Our study started with an assessment of the energy situation in the Caribbean, focusing on both the electricity and the transportation sectors. We analyzed energy inputs and outputs, as well as the resulting greenhouse gas emissions. We then assessed the potential for renewables and energy efficiency in the Caribbean.

Based on an investigation of existing policy frameworks, we developed the sustainable energy targets and outlined a strategy for CARICOM to achieve them. Our strategy includes recommended Priority Initiatives, Policies, Projects, and Activities (PIPPAs) and concrete activities in priority areas. Together, these recommendations address key challenges in the transport and electricity sectors, as well as at the water-energy-food nexus.

C-SERMS’ main success has been in unifying a diverse region under one energy goal.

C-SERMS’ main success has been in unifying a diverse region under one energy goal. From Haiti—the country with the lowest share of access to modern energy services in the Western Hemisphere—to Trinidad and Tobago—one of the world’s largest per capita power consumers and a leading natural gas producer—Caribbean countries have made their commitment clear.

Learn more about C-SERMS by reading the full report, viewing the report’s main findings, or clicking through a country-by-country summary of the energy situation in CARICOM member countries.

We invite you to subscribe to our blog to follow the Caribbean Energy series and more. 


Alexander Ochs is the director of climate and energy at the Worldwatch Institute. Banner photo by Dennis Schroeder (Wikimedia).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *