All posts by Erik Assadourian

Senior Fellow Erik Assadourian is a Senior Fellow at the Worldwatch Institute, where he has studied cultural change, consumerism, economic degrowth, ecological ethics, corporate responsibility, and sustainable communities over the past 11 years. Erik has directed two editions of Vital Signs and four editions of State of the World, including State of the World 2013. Erik also directs Worldwatch’s Transforming Cultures project, which explores innovative new ways to intentionally and proactively transform cultural norms so that living sustainably feels as natural as living as a consumer feels today. Through this project, Erik directed State of the World 2010: Transforming Cultures: From Consumerism to Sustainability and designed Catan: Oil Springs, an eco-educational scenario for the popular board game Settlers of Catan. Over the years he has been interviewed by media around the world and has traveled extensively to communicate his research findings. Before joining Worldwatch, Erik learned environmental organizing as a fellow with Green Corps, and worked as a Toxics and Environmental Health Field Organizer with U.S. PIRG. He graduated from Dartmouth College with majors in Psychology and Religion modified with Anthropology.

Raising a Future Ecowarrior

A few months back I wrote a reflection on raising an ecowarrior thus far (my son is almost 3 now) for Adbusters and I thought I’d repost here, as it grapples directly with the underlying question of “Is Sustainability Still Possible?’ and if not, how should we raise our children?

“It’s … Continue Reading ››

Futureproofing America with a Yardfarming Revolution

Erik Assadourian, co-director of State of the World 2013 and creator of the reality TV show Yardfarmers sat down with Cullen Pope, editor of EATT Magazine, a few weeks back for an interview. We wanted to repost the interview here as Erik offers some insights into his strategy to get us to a more … Continue Reading ››

Escaping Fido’s Cave

Babies and puppies. Everybody seems to love them—perhaps it’s instinctual, perhaps it’s socialization. Probably the latter, for in Washington, DC, where I live, far more people stop to make goo-goo noises at puppies than at babies. And in some cultures, dogs are meat sources, not sources of affection.

Learning from Icarus

What if Icarus’ father—knowing his son would fly too close to the sun—had made the wings he designed more resilient? What if he had used bone and string and not just wax to bind them? Would this ancient myth have turned out any differently? Probably not. Icarus would have simply flown closer to the … Continue Reading ››